48.7 F
Washington D.C.
Friday, May 14, 2021

Minn. police chief, officer who shot black man resign

Kim Potter, the Brooklyn Center police officer who fatally shot Daunte Wright, has resigned along with her Minn. police chief, Tim Gannon. Gannon had said Potter accidentally used her handgun, intending to use her taser. The Associated Press has the story:

Officer who shot Duante Wright thinking she was using her taser resigns, along with police chief

BROOKLYN CENTER, Minn. (AP) — A white police officer who fatally shot a Black man during a traffic stop in a Minneapolis suburb resigned Tuesday, as did the city’s police chief — moves that the mayor said he hoped would help heal the community and lead to reconciliation after two nights of protests and unrest.

But police and protesters faced off once again after nightfall Tuesday, with hundreds of protesters gathering again at Brooklyn Center’s heavily guarded police headquarters, now ringed by concrete barriers and a tall metal fence, and where police in riot gear and National Guard soldiers stood watch. “Murderapolis” was scrawled with black spray paint on a concrete barrier.

“Whose street? Our street!” the crowd chanted under a light snowfall.

About 90 minutes before the curfew deadline, state police announced over a loudspeaker that the gathering had been declared unlawful and ordered the crowds to disperse. That quickly set off confrontations, with protesters launching fireworks toward the station and throwing objects at police, who launched flashbangs and gas grenades, and then marched in a line to force back the crowd.

Protesters confront police over the shooting death of Daunte Wright at a rally at the Brooklyn Center Police Department in Brooklyn Center, Minn., Monday, April 12, 20121. (Richard Tsong-Taatarii/Star Tribune via AP)

“You are hereby ordered to disperse,” authorities announced, warning that anyone not leaving would be arrested. The state police said the dispersal order came before the 10 p.m. curfew because protesters were trying to take down the fencing and throwing rocks at police. The number of protesters dropped rapidly over the next hour, until only a few remained. Police also ordered all media to leave the scene.

The resignations from Officer Kim Potter and Police Chief Tim Gannon came two days after the death of 20-year-old Daunte Wright in Brooklyn Center. Potter, a 26-year veteran, had been on administrative leave following Sunday’s shooting, which happened as the Minneapolis area was already on edge over the trial of an officer charged in George Floyd’s death.

Brooklyn Center Mayor Mike Elliott said at a news conference that the city had been moving toward firing Potter when she resigned. Elliott said he hoped her resignation would “bring some calm to the community,” but that he would keep working toward “full accountability under the law.”

“We have to make sure that justice is served, justice is done. Daunte Wright deserves that. His family deserves that,” Elliott said.

Decision on whether to charge Potter may come on Wednesday

A decision on whether prosecutors will charge Potter could come as soon as Wednesday. Meanwhile, the cities of Brooklyn Center, Minneapolis and St. Paul imposed 10 p.m. curfews.

Gannon has said he believed Potter mistakenly grabbed her gun when she was going for her Taser. She can be heard on her body camera video shouting “Taser! Taser!” However, protesters and Wright’s family members say there’s no excuse for the shooting and it shows how the justice system is tilted against Blacks, noting Wright was stopped for an expired car registration and ended up dead.

Brooklyn Center, Min., Police Chief Tim Gannon talks to the media on Monday, April 12, 2021. Officer Kim Potter white police officer who fatally shot Daunte Wright, a Black man during a traffic stop on Sunday, in the Minneapolis suburb resigned Tuesday, as did Gannon, moves that the mayor said he hoped would help heal the community and lead to reconciliation after two nights of protests and unrest. (Shari Gross/Star Tribune via AP)

Activists who attended the mayor’s news conference called for sweeping changes to the Brooklyn Center Police Department and sharply criticized the acting police chief, Tony Gruenig, for not yet having a plan.

Elliott said the department has about 49 police officers, none of whom live in Brooklyn Center. He said he didn’t have information on racial diversity at hand but that “we have very few people of color in our department.”

The modest suburb just north of Minneapolis has seen its demographics shift dramatically in recent years. In 2000, more than 70% of the city was white. Today, a majority of residents are Black, Asian or Hispanic.

After stopping Wright for the expired license plates, police tried to arrest him on an outstanding warrant. The warrant was for his failure to appear in court on charges that he fled from officers and possessed a gun without a permit during an encounter with Minneapolis police in June.

Body camera footage released Monday shows Wright struggling with police when Potter shouts, “I’ll Tase you! I’ll Tase you! Taser! Taser! Taser!” She draws her weapon after the man breaks free from police outside his car and gets back behind the wheel.

After firing a single shot from her handgun, the car speeds away, and Potter says, “Holy (expletive)! I shot him.”

Wright died of a gunshot wound to the chest, according to the medical examiner.

Protests began within hours.

Naisha Wright, aunt of Daunte Wright, right, yells the name of her deceased nephew during a news conference outside the Hennepin County Government Center, Tuesday, April 13, 2021, in Minneapolis. Daunte Wright, 20, was shot and killed by police Sunday after a traffic stop in Brooklyn Center, Minn. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

In her one-paragraph letter of resignation, Potter said, “I have loved every minute of being a police officer and serving this community to the best of my ability, but I believe it is in the best interest of the community, the department, and my fellow officers if I resign immediately.”

Wright’s father does not buy the explanation that Potter meant to use her taser

Wright’s father, Arbuey Wright, told ABC’s “Good Morning America” that he rejects the explanation that Potter mistook her gun for her Taser.

“I lost my son. He’s never coming back. I can’t accept that. A mistake? That doesn’t even sound right. This officer has been on the force for 26 years. I can’t accept that,” he said.

Chyna Whitaker, mother of Daunte’s son, said at a news conference that she felt police “stole my son’s dad from him.”

The Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association said in a statement Tuesday that “no conclusions should be made until the investigation is complete.”

Prosecutors in Hennepin County, where the shooting occurred, said they have referred the case to nearby Washington County — a practice county attorneys in the Minneapolis area adopted last year in handling police deadly force cases. Washington County Attorney Pete Orput told WCCO-AM that he had received information on the case from state investigators and hoped to have a charging decision on Wednesday. Orput did not immediately respond to a message from The Associated Press.

Elliott, the mayor, called for the governor to move the case to the attorney general to prosecute.

Asked to comment, John Stiles, spokesman for the attorney general’s office, said the attorney general has confidence in Orput’s review of the case.

Ben Crump, the Wright family’s attorney, spoke outside the Minneapolis courthouse where a fired police officer is on trial in Floyd’s death. Crump compared Wright’s death to that of Floyd, who was pinned down by police when they tried to arrest him for allegedly passing a counterfeit $20 at a neighborhood market last May.

Daunte Wright “was not a threat to them,” Crump said. “Was it the best decision? No. But young people don’t always make the best decisions. As his mother said, he was scared.”

Potter has experience with investigations into police shootings. She was the police union president and one of the first officers to respond after Brooklyn Center police fatally shot a man who allegedly tried to stab an officer with a knife in 2019, according to a report from the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office.

Angie Golson, grandmother of Daunte Wright, cries as she speaks during a news conference outside the Hennepin County Government Center, Tuesday, April 13, 2021, in Minneapolis. Daunte Wright, 20, was shot and killed by police Sunday after a traffic stop in Brooklyn Center, Minn. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

After medics arrived, she told the two officers who shot the man to get into separate squad cars, turn off their body cameras, and not to speak to each other. She accompanied two other officers involved in the shooting while investigators interviewed them.

___


By MOHAMED IBRAHIM and MIKE HOUSEHOLDER

Associated Press writers Scott Bauer in Madison, Wisconsin; Stephen Groves in Sioux Falls, South Dakota; and Tim Sullivan in Brooklyn Center contributed to this report.

___

Mohamed Ibrahim is a corps member for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues.

Read more U.S. news

More articles

Latest article

McDonald's

McDonald’s-owned stores increase workers’ pay

0
Various large companies have announces raises for their workers recently, including McDonald's, Chipotle, Oliver Garden, Amazon and Costco. The McDonald's wage increases will apply...
Amazon hiring

Amazon hiring 75,000, those vaccinated get $100

0
Amazon continues to grow even bigger, ramping up hiring with 75,000 new employees in preparation for Prime Day next month. It's become one of...
Alibaba

Big operating loss for Alibaba after fine

0
The Chinese technology firm Alibaba suffered an operating loss for the first time after going public in 2014. It may be due to a...
Fox News

Fox News giving shows to Bongino, Gowdy

0
Two very popular conservatives are getting their own shows on Fox News. Commentator Dan Bongino, who is already a frequent guest, will host a...
New social justice award

New social justice award named after Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

0
The NBA has created a new award named after one of its stars, the Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Social Justice Champion Award. It will be given...